Barbizon school (1830-1870)
Barbizon school

 

 

 

 

 
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The Barbizon school (circa 1830–1870) is an art movement, which occurred in France in 19th century and was named after a village of Barbizon near the forest of Fontainebleau.  The group of artists led by Theodore Rousseau rejected the traditional classical style of painting and aimed to convey the nature in more realistic manner. In 1824 the Salon de Paris exhibited works of John Constable, which influenced some younger artist by his rural scenes. The painters believed in inspiration, which could be drawn directly from nature and the main idea was to work in open air. Trying to convey the life how it is and represent its every aspect, from the awesome to the mundane and ordinary, they painted such subjects as the lives of farmers, gravediggers, woodsmen, poachers, and other workers. 
The leaders of the Barbizon school were Georges Michel, Theodore Rousseau, Jean-Francois Miller, and Corot. Most of them were rejected by the Salon de Paris but nevertheless gave a way such movement as impressionism.

1. Théodore Rousseau, Les chênes d'Apremont, 1852, Oil on canvas, 63,5 × 99,5 cm, Musée d'Orsay

2. Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot,Ville d’Avray, ca. 1867,Oil on canva, Washington, D.C.: National Gallery of Art

3. Jean-François Millet, he Gleaners, 1857, Oil on canvas, 84 × 111 cm, Musée d'Orsay

 

 

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